Who We Are

Who We Are

Steve Rottenborn, Ph.D. (Vice President, Principal)

Steve Rottenborn, Ph.D. (Vice President, Principal)

Phone: 
408.458.3205
Email: 
Expertise: 
Wildlife Ecology
Location: 
San Francisco Bay Area

Dr. Steve Rottenborn is a principal in the Wildlife Ecology group. He specializes in resolving issues related to special-status wildlife species and in meeting the wildlife-related requirements of federal and state environmental laws and regulations. His training has focused on wildlife biology and avian ecology, and he is particularly interested in wetland and riparian habitats and the effects of human activities on birds. Steve’s experience extends to numerous additional special-status animal species as well.

Steve has contributed to more than 600 projects.  The breadth of his ecological training and project experience enables him to expertly manage multidisciplinary projects involving a broad array of biological issues. Examples of the firm’s projects on which Steve served as principal-in-charge or senior manager include the following:

  • Concord Reuse Plan — a 5,000-acre mixed use development on the former Concord Naval Weapons Station, including more than 2,500 acres of conservation area for listed species
  • Candlestick Point/Hunters Point Shipyard — mixed use redevelopment, including habitat enhancements, in southeastern San Francisco
  • South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project — the largest (~15,000 acres) restoration project of its kind in the western United States
  • Envision San José 2040 General Plan Update — updates to the City’s General Plan, including a number of measures to protect and enhance habitats, species’ populations, and wildlife movement
  • Santa Clara Valley Water District Biological Resources On-Call — more than 65 task orders assisting the Water District
  • Anderson Dam Seismic Retrofit Project — addressing biological resources issues associated with the retrofit of Santa Clara County’s largest dam

Steve’s research experience includes conducting studies of the effects of urbanization, land use, and habitat degradation on riparian bird communities in the south San Francisco Bay. This research involved identifying land-use variables influencing abundance of individual bird species, predicting how urbanization would affect riparian bird communities, and studying nest-site selection and reproductive success of urban-nesting red-shouldered hawks. He has studied both shorebird use of agricultural fields and resource partitioning among members of an oak woodland foraging guild, and assessed habitat associations and population dynamics of colonially nesting birds.

Steve received a Ph.D. in biological sciences from Stanford University and a B.S. in biology from the College of William and Mary.